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June 17, 2018
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STOP WAGE THEFT ON WHEELS!
Saturday, June 2nd Town Hall with U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders
 

Congresswoman Nanette Barragan


WE THANK EVERYONE THAT VOTED AND PARTICIPATED IN THE ELECTION PROCESS!

See Below for Unofficial Results for Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County

Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk
Click Above for LA Unofficial Results

San Diego Registrar of VotersSan Diego County
Registrar of Voters

Click Above for SD Unofficial Results

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Orange County Unofficial Results ONLY
Statewide Direct Primary Election

June 5, 2018
For More Information Please Visit OC VOTE: Click Here


List of Contests:

Registration and Turnout

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Controller

Treasurer

Attorney General

Insurance Commissioner

Member, State Board of Equalization 4th District

UNITED STATES SENATOR

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 38th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 39th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 45th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 46th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 47th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 48th District

UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE 49th District

Shall Josh Newman be recalled (removed) from the office of State Sentator, District 29?

Candidates to succeed Josh Newman if he is recalled, for the duration of the term ending

STATE SENATOR 32nd District, Full Term

STATE SENATOR 32nd District, Short Term

STATE SENATOR 34th District

STATE SENATOR 36th District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 55th District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 65th District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 68th District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 69th District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 72nd District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 73rd District

MEMBER OF THE STATE ASSEMBLY 74th District

Judge of the Superior Court Office No. 13

Superintendent of Public Instruction

County Superintendent of Schools

Member, County Board of Education Trustee Area 2

Member, County Board of Education Trustee Area 5

County Supervisor 2nd District

County Supervisor 4th District

County Supervisor 5th District

Assessor

Auditor-Controller

Clerk-Recorder

District Attorney-Public Administrator


U.S. COURT OF APPEALS DECISION

XPO LOGISTICS FREIGHT INC
.

 


PENSION COMMUNICATIONS
TO CONGRESS AND THE U.S. SENATE
REGARDING THE REHABILITATION OF TROUBLED PRIVATE AND PUBLIC PENSION FUNDS BY USE OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE

  The following are example of letters that were mailed to members of both 
  Congress and the U.S. Senate

                                         

                                          

CLICK HERE TO READ LETTER FROM
TIMOTHY A. CANOVA
PROFESSOR OF LAW AND PUBLIC FINANCE

THE TEAMSTERS UNION MEMBERSHIP IS GOING TO HAVE TO BECOME MORE ENGAGED IN THE STRUGGLE TO FIX THE TROUBLED PENSION FUND.

Fraternally,

Patrick D. Kelly


 



*UPDATED EVERYDAY, EXCEPT WEEKENDS** 

Ryan Sets Votes on Immigration as Moderates’ Revolt Falls Short
 



Ghosts of a Hospital Rise in the Village

Lorraine Gordon, Keeper of the Village Vanguard Flame, Dies at 95
June 9, 2018

 

How Good Is the Trump Economy, Really?

It depends on whether you look at the level, the direction or the rate of change — three concepts that are often conflated.

Maybe the Gig Economy Isn’t Reshaping Work After All
June 7, 2018

Politics

Largest federal employees union sues Trump over ‘official time’ rollback

by Lisa Rein May 31 at 1:07 PM Email the author

The largest union representing federal workers took the Trump administration to court Thursday to block a new executive order that severely restricts the time employees may spend on union activity, claiming the president’s action violates the First Amendment and oversteps his constitutional authority.

The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the District by the American Federation of Government Employees ratchets up ­labor-management tensions that have simmered at federal agencies since President Trump took office.

“This president seems to think he is above the law, and we are not going to stand by while he tries to shred workers’ rights,” J. David Cox Sr., national president of the AFGE, said in a statement announcing the lawsuit.

“This is a democracy, not a dictatorship,” Cox said. “No president should be able to undo a law he doesn’t like through administrative fiat.”

The White House referred questions about the case to the Justice Department, which declined to comment.

The restriction on what is known as “official time” — which will ultimately have to be bargained through collective bargaining contracts at federal agencies — was one of three orders the president signed late Friday before the Memorial Day weekend to roll back long-held civil service protections for federal employees.

Under official time, federal employees who also serve as union officials are permitted to work on-duty time to represent employees who have filed grievances claiming unfair labor practices by management or who are appealing disciplinary action against them.

These officials, who spend anywhere between half and all of their time working on union matters, also negotiate collective bargaining agreements. Their responsibilities are limited to representing employees in the workplace and do not include internal union business, such as collecting dues, soliciting membership or elections.

[Read the lawsuit AFGE filed against the Trump administration]

The other executive orders Trump signed instruct agencies to crack down on unions in contract negotiations — with the goal of less union-friendly agreements — and to move more aggressively to fire employees with records of misconduct or poor performance.

Administration officials say these changes, which build on successful efforts in several states to weaken public employee unions, will make government smaller and more efficient by weeding out bad apples and rewarding employees who play by the rules.

But the most controversial change has turned out to be to the official time guarantee that Congress gave federal employee unions four decades ago. That guarantee allowed union representatives to use some of their work time to negotiate for workers on everything except pay, which is determined by Congress through the General Schedule.

Conservatives in Congress have tried unsuccessfully for years to restrict official time. The administration, which says the work of public employee unions should not be heavily subsidized by taxpayers, estimates that reducing the practice to 25 percent will save taxpayers as much as $100 million a year.

AFGE, which represents about 700,000 federal workers, argues in its lawsuit that the Trump administration has violated the union’s right to freedom of association, guaranteed by the First Amendment. The lawsuit claims the administration has singled out labor organizations for disparate treatment.

The union is using language from the executive order to make its point: The order prohibits union employees from using official time to represent other federal workers in grievance or disciplinary proceedings, but it provides an exception for employees working on their own cases.

“There is no valid basis to distinguish grievances brought by the union [on behalf of the] union or grievances in which a union representative seeks to represent another employee from grievances brought on an employee’s own behalf or instances in which an employee is to appear as a witness in a grievance proceeding,” the lawsuit says.

By singling out unions for what it calls “disparate treatment,” the lawsuit says the executive order “unlawfully restrains and retaliates against AFGE and its union-member representatives, separately and collectively, in and for the exercise of their rights to expressive association.”

AFGE also says that mandating the number of hours agencies may authorize for employees’ use of official time to 25 percent illegally changes a provision of the law Congress passed in 1978 — the Civil Service Reform Act — that governs collective bargaining and determines that official time is lawful.

[Trump takes aim at federal bureaucracy with executive orders rolling back civil service protections]

“Congress passed these laws to guarantee workers a collective voice in resolving workplace issues and improving the services they deliver to the public every day — whether it’s caring for veterans, ensuring our air and water are safe, preventing illegal weapons and drugs from crossing our borders, or helping communities recover from hurricanes and other disasters,” Cox said.

“We will not stand by and let this administration willfully violate the Constitution to score political points.”

Leaders of the National ­Treasury Employees Union, the ­second-largest federal labor organization, with about 150,000 members, said they are still studying what the executive orders mean for existing collective bargaining contracts , weighing legal action and communicating with their members.

“Our basic message [to our members] is that the administration has made it very clear they think federal workers are dispensable, that they don’t respect and value front-line employees,” said Tony Reardon, the NTEU’s national president.

Teachers Find Public Support as Campaign for Higher Pay Goes to Voters
May 31, 2018

 

California Governor’s Race Forces Candidates to Face the Past


 

June 2, 2018

'This is the weirdest race in the country'

Quarreling millionaires and a crowded ballot in Orange County have threatened to erase a key House district from the Democratic target map.

Updated

Single-Payer Health Care in California: Here’s What It Would Take
May 25, 2018

 

Never Mind the News Media: Politicians Test Direct-to-Voter Messaging

May 31, 2018

Villaraigosa scrambles to make it past Tuesday's primary in race for California governor

Trump Moves to Ease the Firing of Federal Workers

Image
The Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington. The Trump administration’s order changing work rules across the Civil Service built on legislation passed last year that was aimed at the veterans’ agency.CreditTom Brenner/The New York Times

How the Supreme Court is invoking a 1925 law to restrict workers' rights today

Behind New York’s Housing
Crisis: Weakened Laws
and Fragmented Regulation

Affordable housing is vanishing as landlords exploit a broken system, pushing
out rent-regulated tenants and catapulting apartments into the free market.

The Supreme Court Sticks It to Workers, Again

By The Editorial Board

The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

Trump Pardons Jack Johnson,

Heavyweight Boxing Champion 


                 

    President Trump, with Sylvester Stallone and former and current boxers in attendance, signed a 
    posthumous pardon for Jack Johnson on Thursday.
CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times
                                 By John Eligon and Michael D. Shear

                                                                May 24, 2018


How the Supreme Court is invoking a 1925 law to restrict workers' rights today 

                      How the Supreme Court is invoking a 1925 law to restrict workers' rights today

                    Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch in 2017. (Sait Serkan Gurbuz / Associated Press)


BEHIND NEW YORK'S HOUSING CRISIS: WEAKENED LAWS AND FRAGMENTED REGULATION
by: Kem Barker, May 20, 2018
The New York Times

LA City Council Unanimously Vetoes Preferential Agreement for Lawbreaking Trucking Company!!!

Justice for Port Truck Drivers

www.JusticeforPortDrivers.org

PRESS RELEASE FOR: Tuesday, May 8, 2018

PRESS CONTACT: Barb Maynard, 323-351-9321 barb@actnowstrategies.com

Los Angeles City Council Unanimously Vetoes Preferential Operating Agreement Granted to Law-Breaking Trucking and Warehouse Company Approved by Port of LA Harbor Commission

Los Angeles, CA – Today, the Los Angeles City Council, which oversees the largest container port in North America, unanimously vetoed the Foreign Trade Zone Operating Agreement (FTZ) granted by the Port’s Harbor Commission to California Cartage’s warehousing and port trucking operations located on Port property in Wilmington, CA. The FTZ designation provides a clear competitive advantage to NFI/Cal Cartage, the largest trucking and warehousing operation at the port, by providing tax breaks to its retail clients. The Los Angeles Harbor Commission approved the FTZ for Cal Cartage, which was purchased by NFI Industries in October 2017, despite the ongoing pattern of violations of health and safety, employment, and labor laws at the company (see list of legal and regulatory action below).

For the past three years, NFI/Cal Cartage warehouse workers and port drivers have persistently demanded that the LA Harbor Commissioners address the enduring law-breaking at the company’s warehousing and trucking facilities, which are located at 2401 East Pacific Coast Highway, which is owned by the Port of Los Angeles. This site includes the NFI/Cal Cartage warehouse and two related trucking companies, K&R Transportation and California Cartage Express.

“We entrust our City authorities with ensuring compliance with all City contracts, especially when these agreements give corporations like NFI/Cal Cartage a competitive advantage,” said Eric Tate, Secretary-Treasurer, Teamsters Local 848, in a letter to Councilmembers in advance of the vote. “Given the sheer volume of government findings, ongoing investigations, and unmistakable evidence that Cal Cartage is a recidivist law breaker, it is overwhelmingly clear to us that the Harbor Commission failed to ensure that Cal Cartage meets the necessary requirements in the Operating Agreement.”

“Time and again I have told the LA Harbor Commission that NFI/Cal Cartage is breaking the law by misclassifying me as an independent contractor yet they continue to give sweetheart deals to the company,” said Gustavo Villa, a misclassified port truck driver employed by Cal Cartage Express. “I am so grateful that Councilmember Buscaino stepped in to block this sweetheart deal for a company that has shown no regard for the laws of the land.”

“For the past four years, I have worked at the Cal Cartage warehouse and have been outspoken about the unsafe conditions there. There are forklifts that don't brake and the high heat is a problem. A co-worker got sick because of the over 100 degree heat inside the container and management said to just cover him with boxes,” said Bruce Jefferson, a Cal Cartage temp warehouse worker. “Every job at the ports should be a good and safe job, and I’m glad that the City Council agrees that no special tax breaks should be given to companies that are breaking the law.”

“We should never give incentives, like the Foreign Trade Zone Permit, to law-breaking companies where abuse and pressure to work quickly are common, where faulty brakes on forklifts are left unrepaired, and where truck drivers continue to drive for 18-20 hours per day for pennies,” said Alice Berliner, Southern California Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health (SoCalCOSH). “When the Harbor Commission renewed the NFI/Cal Cartage Foreign Trade Zone Permit, they sent the message that it’s okay to pay workers poverty wages, it’s okay to steal drivers’ wages, it’s okay to allow occupational injuries, and in some cases fatalities, on City property. And most importantly, when the Harbor Commission renewed NFI/Cal Cartage’s FTZ Agreement, it sent the message that the City of Los Angeles condones this abuse. Today’s Council veto of the Agreement reverses this unjust decision and sends a strong message that worker health and safety matters.”

On April 5, 2018, the LA Harbor Commission approved a one-year Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) Operating Agreement with the company. On April 17, 2018, the LA City Council approved a motion filed by Los Angeles City Councilmember Joe Buscaino to assert jurisdiction over the matter, and on May 1, 2018, the Trade, Travel, and Tourism Committee recommended that Council veto the Harbor Commission’s approval of the FTZ agreement. Today, the full City Council voted to veto NFI/Cal Cartage’s FTZ Operating Agreement.

Background: Regulatory Action and Litigation at NFI/California Cartage

California Cartage, based in Wilmington, CA, is one of the largest goods movement companies in America, with warehouses and port trucking operations across the U.S. Referred to herein as “NFI/Cal Cartage,” this family of companies was recently acquired by the New Jersey-based National Freight Industries (NFI). Previous to this acquisition, Cal Cartage was owned and managed by Robert Curry, Sr. and his family. NFI/Cal Cartage represents the largest trucking operation at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach by a wide margin. 

Port Trucking Operations

The NFI/Cal Cartage family of companies includes five major trucking operations at the Ports of LA and Long Beach. The four largest - K&R Transportation, California Cartage Express, ContainerFreight EIT and California Multimodal LLC (CMI) – have been facing multiple claims in the courts and government agencies for misclassifying their drivers. In several instances, agencies have already determined that drivers were, in fact, employees. K&R and California Cartage Express operate out of the same property as the Cal Cartage warehouse (described in the following section), CMI operates out of a nearby Wilmington yard, and ContainerFreight operates out of a yard in Long Beach. Combined, more than 600 alleged misclassified drivers work for these companies.

Agency Investigations and Determinations

California Labor Commissioner

Employee determinations:

  • Over the past two years, there have been at least 12 decisions issued by the California Labor Commissioner in individual claims filed by NFI/Cal Cartage drivers working for K&R Transportation, Cal Cartage Express, ContainerFreight, and CMI. All of these claims found that the drivers were, in fact, employees, and not independent contractors. Together, those decisions ordered NFI/Cal Cartage to pay those 12 drivers a total of $1,419,102.62 for Labor Code violations including unlawful deductions and unreimbursed expenses. NFI/Cal Cartage has appealed twelve of these cases, settling eight of them, while one remains pending in Superior Court.

Pending claims:

  • There have been an additional 28 Labor Commissioner claims that drivers have filed against NFI/Cal Cartage, all of which appear to be pending (of these, 15 were filed by K&R drivers and 12 by CMI drivers). 10 of the K&R drivers had their hearings in December 2017, and a decision is pending. There are hearings scheduled beginning May 7, 2018 in the claims of 10 CMI drivers. The total liability for those 28 claims is over $5 million.

California Employment Development Department (EDD)

  • At least four K&R drivers have been determined to have been employees – not independent contractors – by the California EDD in individual benefits determinations.
  • In June and September of 2017, the California EDD filed at least two tax liens against K&R Transportation.

Los Angeles City Attorney

  • On January 8, 2018, Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer announced that his office had filed lawsuits against Cal Cartage Express, CMI, and K&R Transportation for violation of Unfair Competition Law by misclassifying port truck drivers as independent contractors and evade paying taxes and providing benefits to drivers.

Private Litigation

  • In recent years, NFI/Cal Cartage has faced four class action lawsuits in California Superior Court for multiple Labor Code violations, including willful misclassification, unlawful deductions, unreimbursed expenses, unpaid minimum wages, and failure to provide meal and rest breaks, along with violation of California’s Unfair Competition Law. In December 2017, the last pending case settled for $3.5 million and a motion for final approval is scheduled for May 2018. The company recently settled three similar suits.
  • NFI/Cal Cartage also recently settled two “mass action” lawsuits for misclassification and wage theft in CA Superior Court involving 55 drivers.

Warehouse Operations

Cal Cartage Container Freight Station in Wilmington, CA, is a warehouse and freight center on Port of LA property and employs approximately 500 workers, with 80 percent of the workforce being employed through a temp agency. While Cal Cartage warehouse workers once had good paying jobs that provided benefits, they have not had representation from a union in over 30 years and conditions have suffered. Workers are now paid the state minimum wage with little or no benefits (even though they are entitled to a higher wage under the Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance), and work in health and safety conditions that are deplorable. The company has been cited for serious health and safety violations twice in the past three years, and workers face serious retaliation resulting in unfair labor practices charges and five strikes. 

Health & Safety

The warehouse facility has health and safety issues. The building was built in the 1940s and is poorly maintained. Several workers have been hurt just trying to walk around the facility due to potholes and poor infrastructure. The machines, including forklifts, are not maintained and often have faulty brakes and horns—leading to accidents. Workers filed a formal complaint with Cal/OSHA in June 2015, triggering an investigation at the facility. In November 2015, over $21,000 in citations were issued—4 serious and 6 general penalties. It was noted in these citations that the chipped paint at this facility contains lead.

Cal/OSHA reinvestigated the facility a year later, resulting in additional serious citations in November 2016 amounting $67,150 for the warehouse and $51,275 for the staffing agency. Citations included not providing workers with steel-toed boots, not properly attaching shipping containers to the dock, and repeat violations for unsafe brakes on forklifts. The investigation regarding the company’s abatement of these citations is still active. Workers filed a third Cal/OSHA complaint in November 2017, and the investigation is still pending.

National Labor Relations Board

  • On February 28, 2018, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Ariel Sotolongo issued a decision finding that California Cartage and its subsidiary Orient Tally violated workers’ rights at the 2401 E. Pacific Coast Highway, warehouse, including by engaging in unlawful interrogation, implied threats of termination, and confronting workers in a physically aggressive fashion. This decision ordered the company to cease and desist the unlawful behavior, and was issued following a hearing held in June 2017. The case arose after Region 21 of the National Labor Relations Board issued a March 2016 Consolidated Complaint (Cases: 21-CA-160242 and 21-CA-162991) against California Cartage for unfair labor practice (ULP) charges.
  • In 2016, workers at the same warehouse filed additional ULP charges with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters against California Cartage for several unfair labor practices including then company owner Bob Curry threatening to close the warehouse if workers unionized. These charges are pending.

Private Litigation

On December 17, 2014, workers from the California Cartage warehouse on Pacific Coast Highway at the Port of Los Angeles filed a class action lawsuit alleging millions of dollars in wage theft. The workers, many of whom are paid the state minimum wage and have worked through a staffing agency for years, are entitled to the benefits of the Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance because the warehouse where they work is operated on City of Los Angeles property. Despite this, the workers at the warehouse have not been paid the applicable living wage rate in the 18 years since the ordinance passed.

Under the City of Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance, Cal Cartage is currently required to provide each worker with either $12.52 per hour for an all-cash wage or $11.27 per hour plus $1.25 per hour in health benefits and as of July 1, 2017, it will go up to be $12.73 all-cash wage or $11.48 plus $1.25 in health benefits. Further, each worker is entitled to 12 paid days off per year. The law extends the obligation to any staffing agencies that are contracted by Cal Cartage and that directly employ more than 50 percent of the workers in the warehouse facility.

The case is currently in mediation proceedings.

NFI/Cal Cartage’s key customers include: Lowe’s, Amazon, TJ Maxx, Home Depot, Kmart, and Sears, as well as the U.S. Department of Defense.

###

High housing costs are driving out lower-income Californians, reports say

By Andrew Khouri

May 03, 2018 - 3:30 PM

How a California Republican Party endorsement in the governor’s race could help the GOP hang on to Congress 

By Phil Willon and Seema Mehta

May 03, 2018 - 6:20 PM

 

**GOOD NEWS**

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CALIFORNIA

Lessons From Rust-Belt Cities That Kept Their Sheen

California's top court makes it more difficult for employers to classify workers as independent contractors

Republicans hope to ride a gas-tax repeal to victory

Gertrude Jeannette, Actor, Director and Cabdriver, Dies at 103

NBC 6 Impact - Tim Canova

Jackie Nespral sits down with the candidate for Congress - who again is going for the seat occupied by Debbie Wasserman Schultz, but this time not as a Democrat.

(Published Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018)

Local warehouse accused of sexual harassment, dangerous work conditions

DNC Chairman Defends Lawsuit Against Russia, Trump Campaign, WikiLeaks
by David Weigel, April 22, 2018
The Washington Post

Fearing Chaos, National Democrats Plunge Into Midterm Primary Fights

Dysfunction and infighting cripple labor agency

‘This is like when Yugoslavia broke up.’

By IAN KULLGREN and ANDREW HANNA

The National Labor Relations Board headquarters in Washington is pictured. | AP Photo

It’s hardly new for politicians to wrangle over the National Labor Relations Board. This time, though, partisan warfare has penetrated the agency itself. | Jon Elswick/AP Photo

A federal agency that regulates labor unions is engaged in something close to civil war as political appointees, career bureaucrats and its inspector general battle one another.

The agency is the National Labor Relations Board, created in 1935 to promote collective bargaining and adjudicate disputes between businesses and workers. An independent agency insulated — in theory — from partisan politics, the NLRB under President Donald Trump is consumed to the point of paralysis by fights over personnel policies, ethics rules and legal decisions that stem from ancient political disagreements over the proper balance of power between employers and workers.

Story Continued Below

The in-fighting is bad news for workers who seek the NLRB’s help to organize unions and increase corporate accountability for labor law violations — and also, paradoxically, bad news for employers who want to fight unionization and limit corporate liability by reversing pro-labor rulings issued under the Obama NLRB.

“This is like when Yugoslavia broke up,” said one employment lobbyist who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “You’re fighting over things that happened 10,000 years ago — you killed my ancestor so I’m going to kill you.”

At the center of the controversy, which has pitted civil servants against political appointees, conservatives against liberals and, on occasion, conservatives against other conservatives, are Peter Robb, the NLRB’s bare-knuckled general counsel, and board member William Emanuel, a controversial Trump appointee with deep ties to business.

Robb outraged the NLRB’s career staff in January by proposing a restructuring that would demote regional directors, whom the business lobby considers too pro-union. That prompted revolt from the NLRB’s employee unions. “Peter Robb is considering measures to ‘streamline’ the NLRB that will only make it harder to remedy federal labor law violations,” read a flyer that three New York union locals distributed at an event Robb attended in February.

Nearly 400 NLRB employees followed up March 15 in a letter sent to members of Congress that said Robb’s changes “strike us as unlikely to generate cost savings for the agency. What they do seem likely to achieve is the frustration of our efforts to provide members of the public with high quality, thorough investigation.”

The second and more elaborate NLRB controversy concerns Emanuel's decision not to recuse himself in December from Hy-Brand Industrial Contractors, a pro-business ruling in which the NLRB’s inspector general later concluded Emanuel had a conflict of interest. After the inspector general issued his report, the NLRB vacated the ruling.

The two story lines crossed this month when Robb issued a legal opinion that said he “does not agree with the conclusions reached in the IG report,” and accused three NLRB members of breaking the law. Robb faulted the members — including the Republican chairman — for vacating Hy-Brand without consulting Emanuel, and urged the board to reinstate Hy-Brand. It’s highly unusual for an NLRB general counsel to criticize the board’s judgment so harshly. The White House, signaling apparent agreement with Robb, replaced NLRB Chairman Marvin Kaplan last week with the just-confirmed board member John Ring. (Kaplan will remain as board member.)

Meanwhile, the NLRB’s inspector general, David Berry, is investigating a second NLRB member, Mark Pearce, who is one of the board’s two Democrats. (By law, two of the NLRB’s five board members are chosen by whichever party does not occupy the White House.) Berry is following on a complaint filed by the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a conservative nonprofit, based on a Wall Street Journal editorial that accused Pearce of alerting in advance attendees at an American Bar Association meeting in Puerto Rico that Hy-Brand would be vacated. Pearce did not answer a request for comment.

Story Continued Below

Berry, in turn, stands accused by the National Right To Work Legal Defense Foundation, the legal arm of the anti-union National Right To Work Committee, of disclosing confidential board deliberations improperly in his report on Emanuel, and in a follow-up report issued one month later. The right-to-work group asked an umbrella group, the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, to investigate. Berry did not answer a request for comment.

“It’s sort of like 'Game of Thrones,'” said Roger King, a friend of Emanuel’s and senior labor and employment counsel for the HR Policy Association.

Or maybe three-dimensional chess. The National Right to Work Committee is a natural ally to Emanuel, but, remarkably, it’s come to regard Emanuel as a problem that must not be replicated in future NLRB nominations, lest pro-labor Democrats gain an upper hand through additional recusals.

In its March newsletter, the group revealed that the Trump administration ignored its advice “not to choose … another management attorney who would have to recuse himself or herself potentially from vast numbers of cases involving clients of the attorney’s former employer.” That advice, the newsletter complained, “went unheeded” when Trump nominated Ring, a partner at the management-side law firm Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, “whose client list is even longer than Littler Mendelson’s.” The Senate confirmed Ring last week.

“For the next year and a half,” warned National Right To Work Committee vice president Matthew Leen in the newsletter, “two of the three NLRB members who aren’t profoundly biased in favor of forced unionism may have to recuse themselves from multiple cases.”

In effect, Leen was saying that the Trump administration was so blatantly anti-labor that it may be unable to fulfill its anti-labor objectives.

It’s hardly new for politicians to wrangle over the NLRB. In 2012, the board made headlines when President Barack Obama tested the limits of his executive power by bypassing Congress and granting three recess appointments to the NLRB even though the Senate was technically in session. Obama ended up losing in the Supreme Court.

This time, though, partisan warfare has penetrated the agency itself.

General counsel Robb sent senior agency staffers reeling after he announced in a Jan. 11 conference call that he wanted to consolidate the agency’s 26 field offices into larger “districts” overseen by officials hand-picked by him. Under Robb’s plan, regional directors would lose their classification as members of the Senior Executive Service — the civil service’s highest rank — and be replaced by a new layer of officials who'd be answerable to Robb.

The title “general counsel” makes Robb sound like a lawyer for NLRB management, but in fact it’s arguably the agency’s most powerful position. The NLRB general counsel is the agency’s gatekeeper, a sort of prosecutor who brings cases before the board. The vast majority of NLRB cases are processed at the NLRB’s 26 field offices and never reach the board. The field offices are staffed by career officials who don’t typically agree with the pro-management outlook of Robb, to whom they report.

Story Continued Below

In a letter to Robb shortly after the January conference call, the regional directors called his proposed changes “very major” and complained that they hadn’t “heard an explanation of the benefits to be gained.” They also warned that enacting such changes might prompt senior directors and managers to retire en masse — a clear shot across the bow.

In reply, another official from the general counsel’s office proposed by email additional restrictions on the decision-making power of regional officials, such as requiring all cases go through headquarters for initial review.

Robb declined to comment for this story and, according to a source familiar with his thinking, is upset that the controversy spilled into public view.

Marshall Babson, a former Democrat appointee to the NLRB, said that Robb’s proposed changes risk making the NLRB less efficient. “If you’re talking about injecting another level of review, that could slow things down,” he said.

Jennifer Abruzzo, who was acting general counsel before Robb, agreed. “I think that’s a mistake,” she said. “I think the regional directors know what they’re doing.”

Shifting rationales for the changes have intensified the career staff’s suspicions about Robb’s motives. At the March ABA meeting in Puerto Rico, Robb’s deputy John Kyle said they were intended to bring the agency in line with the White House’s proposed 9 percent budget cut for the agency. But the $1.3 trillion spending bill signed into law last month by President Donald Trump, H.R. 1625 (115), rejected that cut and maintained funding at current levels.

“It certainly undercuts the general counsel’s rationale for restructuring,” said Karen Cook, president of the NLRB Professional Association. “He will try to move forward with his plan, though, on the basis that he expects a severe cut to the 2019 budget.“

The budget picture grew more complex Tuesday when the White House budget office alerted NLRB that the agency should spend only $264 million of the $274 million it received in the spending bill, a 3.6 percent reduction. Such a rescission, were it to become permanent, would require congressional approval under the 1974 Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act.

“I am unaware of a single instance in the past wherein the White House or OMB subjected the NLRB to the budget rescission process,” said Marshall Babson, a former board member.

Fevered though the Robb Revolt is, it hasn’t yet engulfed members of the board itself. The same can’t be said about the controversy surrounding Emanuel and his participation in the December Hy-Brand decision.

Hy-Brand narrowed the circumstances under which a business could be classified a so-called joint employer, jointly liable for labor violations committed by its contractors or franchisees. It reversed an earlier ruling in Browning-Ferris Industries, a 2016 decision by the Obama NLRB that broadened the circumstances under which a business could be classified a joint employer. Fast-food chains like McDonald’s were outraged by Browning-Ferris because it put them on the hook for maltreatment of employees over whom they didn’t necessarily maintain direct control.

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Hy-Brand was rushed out along with several other pro-management decisions shortly before a Republican NLRB member’s term was about to end in December, leaving the board deadlocked, 2-2. The overturning of Browning-Ferris took many by surprise, because Hy-Brand wasn’t a case that had much to do with the joint-employer issue.

“It was a rush to judgment,” said Wilma Liebman, a Democratic board member under Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Obama.

One week after the Hy-Brand ruling, congressional Democrats accused the NLRB of loading the dice by allowing Emanuel to participate. Emanuel’s former law firm, Littler Mendelson, had represented a party in Browning-Ferris, noted a Dec. 21 letter to Emanuel from Senate HELP Committee ranking member Patty Murray (D-Wash.), House Education and the Workforce Committee ranking member Bobby Scott (D-Va.) and others. In the letter, the six Democrats posed several questions to Emanuel about his participation in Hy-Brand.

In his response, first reported by ProPublica, Emanuel said he wasn’t aware at the time of the ruling that his firm had been involved in Browning-Ferris, noting Littler’s very long client list. Unfortunately for Emanuel, he’d already noted his firm’s participation in Browning-Ferris on a questionnaire submitted during his confirmation hearing. Emanuel scrambled to revise his response, but the damage was done, and inspector general Berry opened an investigation. The first report, issued Feb. 9, was scathing, finding “a serious and flagrant problem and/or deficiency in the board's administration of its deliberative process.” Emanuel, Berry concluded, should have recused himself from the decision to overturn the Obama-era standard.

The NLRB’s other three board members, including Trump-nominated chairman Marvin Kaplan, were persuaded by Berry’s reasoning and vacated Hy-Brand, waiting to act until after Emanuel departed for the ABA conference in Puerto Rico. Emanuel was stunned when a fellow attendee pulled up the ruling on a cellphone, according to a source who was present at the conference.

“You should have seen the look on his face,” this person said. “He had no knowledge of it in advance. He was totally floored.”

Emanuel, who declined to comment for this story, hired Zuckerman Spaeder, a prominent white-collar law firm that previously represented former International Monetary Fund Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

Emanuel’s defenders insist he did nothing wrong because his firm wasn’t directly involved in Hy-Brand. Zuckerman Spaeder Chairman Dwight Bostwick argued in a letter to Berry that he'd evaluated Emanuel under an unusually strict standard that “has the potential to bedevil and frustrate this agency for years to come” and “‘weaponize’ the ethics rules for purposes of improperly excluding presidential appointees from doing the jobs they were sworn to do.”

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Bostwick also wrote that one month after the Hy-Brand decision, the NLRB’s designated ethics official told Emanuel that she didn’t believe Emanuel should have been required to recuse himself in that case. According to the letter, Emanuel asked for that opinion in writing, but the request was denied at the OIG’s request.

Emanuel’s allies have cried foul, noting that former Democratic NLRB member Craig Becker participated in cases involving local chapters of the Service Employees International Union despite having previously been counsel to SEIU. In that instance, Berry raised no red flags. Becker declined to comment on the record.

The conflict-of-interest charge is “based on a house of cards and not a very strong one at that,” said King, the attorney with the HR Policy Association. “We see a long-term game plan to destabilize and undermine the NLRB.”

In his second inspector general report on Emanuel, issued March 20, Berry concluded that Emanuel violated the Trump administration’s ethics pledge, which states: “I will not for a period for two years from the date of my appointment participate in any particular matter involving specific parties that is directly and substantially related to my former employer or former clients.” But in his letter to Berry, Bostwick said he “respectfully disagree[d] … with the determination the member Emanuel violated his presidential ethics pledge.”

Berry acquitted Emanuel of the most serious charge: lying to Congress about whether he was aware of a possible conflict of interest. But that did little to cool Congress' fury. After Berry issued the report, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) called on Emanuel to resign, saying he “no longer has the credibility” to serve.

CORRECTION: Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this story misstated a proposed reduction to the NLRB budget. Also, an earlier version of this story misstated the new NLRB Chairman’s first name and the name of the HR Policy Association.

Portman at Today’s Joint Select Committee on Solvency of Multiemployer Pensions Plans Hearing: “The Status Quo is Unacceptable”
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  At the second meeting of the Joint Select Committee on Solvency of Multiemployer PensionsPlans today, U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-OH) made the case that the panel must work together on solutions that address the multiemployer pension crisis and deliver results, saying that, “the status quo is not acceptable.”Portman is hopeful that his colleagues on both sides of the aisle can come together to achieve a comprehensive and permanent solution that protects earned pensions, protects taxpayer dollars, prevents the insolvency of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, and alleviates pressure on employers. The focus of the hearing was on the legal structure and history of the multiemployer pension system, and Portman focused his questions on funding rules for plan sponsors and employer withdrawal liability, which are important issues in ensuring that plans can improve their solvency without placing an undue burden on contributing employers.  
 
The Joint Select Committee on Solvency of Multiemployer Pension Plans consists of 16 members of Congress: four Republicans and four Democrats in the both the House and Senate. The deadline for the Committee to vote on a statement of findings and recommendations, and propose legislation to carry out these recommendations, is November 30th.In order to successfully report out legislation, a minimum of five out of the eight members of both parties must support it.
 
Transcript of the questioning can be found below and a video can be foundhere.
 
Portman: “The information that you are able to provide us is critical to helping us figure this out, and it is complicated, and there are different rules from multiemployers as we’ve talked about today. I think there’s a consensus around the table, I hope, that the status quo is not acceptable and that was your first summary comment, Mr. Goldman. I think, also, there is a deep interest in figuring out what we could do going forward to not just provide some solvency for Central States plan and PBGC that could otherwise go insolvent as soon as 2025, but also to put rules in place going forward that could solve some of the problems that have occurred, and one is withdrawal liability. You talked about that a little bit, Mr. Goldman, it was your third point, you said, ‘The status quo is not acceptable, many plans remain healthy’ and you talked about withdraw liability. Your point was that it keeps employers from being able to effectively help solve the problem, right?”
 
Mr. Ted Goldman, Senior Pensions Fellow at the American Academy of Actuaries: “Yes.”
 
Portman: “The key question I think we need to spend a lot of time on figuring out is the extent to which this insolvency is going to drive more employers into bankruptcy and create more issues, and one of the issues that concerns me is for the roughly 200 employers on Ohio and Central States, they would be reducing contributions for other multiemployer plans too, right? Creating a contagion effect, as you all call it. That threatens to compound the entire multiemployer system. There are many ways this could happen under current laws as evident from reading your report. The withdrawal liability issue and the possibility of a mass withdrawal, once Central States becomes insolvent. On page 46 of the Joint Committee report that we got, you noted, Mr. Barthold that the amount of an employer’s withdrawal liability is in theory determined by the plan’s sponsor and generally based on the employer’s portion of the plans unfunded, vested benefits. However, it is my understanding that the amount of withdrawal liability that employers actually pay is calculated based on their previous contributions to the plan and is payable with interest in annual installments and that those can last up to a maximum of 20 years and can also be paid in a lump sum based on that present value at 20 years, or it can be a negotiated solution between the plan sponsor and the employer. Can any of you comment on how often employers pay the full withdrawal liability, pay it off within the 20-year period, versus having some of the withdrawal liability forgiven at year 20?”
 
Mr. Tom Barthold, Chief of Staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation:“Senator Portman, I do not know the answer.”
 
Mr. Goldman: “It is not uncommon for employers to not pay that full liability. There is a mechanism that has a 20-year payment cap, and after you’ve paid those 20 years, you’re done. It doesn’t always necessarily align with the total amount you should have paid, so that’s another sort of leakage from the process and sometimes there is a negotiation up front and a lump sum settlement that is often well below the total value of that withdrawal liability, mostly dependent on the ability of the withdrawing employer to be able to pay, so it is better to get something than nothing.”
 
Portman: “It’s not uncommon, you’re saying, in that year 20, for you to have that withdrawal liability forgiven, causing leakage, and that money never comes back in. How would employer withdrawal burden change in the event of a mass withdrawal once a plan becomes insolvent?”
 
Mr. Goldman: “In the mass withdrawal, I’m blanking out on how that works. I’ll have to get back to you on that one.”
 
Portman: “I think when there’s a mass withdrawal there’s no 20-year cap on the payment.”
 
Mr. Goldman: “That’s right, there’s no 20-year cap and everybody has to pay up at that point.”
 
Portman: “Right, which is very hard to imagine, right? We have lots of issues here but one is, what is the current law, with regard to withdrawal liability, doing to make these plans even riskier and take away some of the possibility of us solving this problem? Another question that I’m not going to have time to ask but I would like to get an answer in writing if I could is, on the rate of return, what do we assume the rate of return is, which is really the discount rate---and I think in multi-employer plans is really seven to eight percent---and how often has that been true? In other words, is part of our problem here just that we have just estimated that there be a much higher return on investment then there actually has been?”
 
Mr. Goldman: “Yes, and by the way on the cap, you’re right, the cap goes away and a payment is in perpetuity in theory. On the interest rate, one thing to keep in mind is this is a very long-term pension plan and it does have a long timeline, a long investment horizon so you’re funding for people when they join the plan in their twenties and projecting out when they’re actually going to get their last payment at death. So, the long-term rate reflects long-term expectations and also reflects the investment mix of a plan so it is unique to a plan and each plan has to go through a process of assuring that the rate they select is defensible and appropriate.”
 
Portman: “If you could give me some comments in writing on how many times this seven or eight percent has been achieved, that would be great, thanks.”
 

AFL-CIO


Dear Union Leader,

Something is happening in America. A growing number of working people are recognizing that the best way to raise our own standing is by standing with the person next to us. Collective action is on the rise.

Building power for working people was the focus of our district meetings held from coast to coast over the past several weeks. Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, Executive Vice President Tefere Gebre and I were inspired by the energy and enthusiasm local unions brought to each of these gatherings.

We focused on the political landscape, the need to increase our density and the ways we can use the 2018 election to engage with our members on issues. We highlighted the Workers’ Bill of Rights and our Path to Power program, which is helping elect more union members to office.

We talked about the threats of Janus and right to work and our power to overcome them. And we made some important asks like assigning local union coordinators, identifying elected officials who are union members and incorporating Common Sense Economics into your outreach.

We are bringing our vision of a robust, diverse and politically independent labor movement to life. Since our final district meeting April 10, more than 10,000 new members have joined our movement. Flight attendants at JetBlue (TWU), utility workers at Atlanta Gas Light (IBEW), registered nurses at Stanford Valley (CNA/NNU), health care workers at UMass Medical (AFSCME), personal support workers and registered nurses at Spectrum Health (IAM), editorial staff at the New Republic (TNG-CWA) and teaching and research assistants at Harvard University (UAW), just to name a few.

This comes on top of the historic teacher strikes sweeping the country and a special election in Pennsylvania where labor catapulted Conor Lamb to Congress.

Clearly, momentum is on our side. I couldn’t be prouder of the work we’re doing together. But even in good times, we can’t afford to let up.

Let’s keep building power for working people by raising our voices and growing our movement.

In solidarity,

Rich
--
Richard Trumka
President, AFL-CIO



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Visit us at www.aflcio.org | Facebook | Twitter
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CONGRESSWOMAN MAXINE WATERS NAMED TO TIME'S 100 MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE OF 2018

WASHINGTON -- TIME named Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA-43), Ranking Member of the House Financial Services Committee, to the 2018 TIME 100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The list, now in its fifteenth year, recognizes the activism, innovation and achievement of the world’s most influential individuals. The TIME tribute to Congresswoman Waters, written by Yara Shahidi, is below: 

Congresswoman Maxine Waters of the 43rd District of California, a.k.a. Auntie Maxine, has made my generation proud to be nieces and nephews. She is adored and admired by people who care about social justice and is oh so eloquent in letting the world, particularly the white men of Congress who dare test her acumen, know that she is not here for any nonsense. From “reclaiming my time” to leading a movement to “impeach him,” she says what many of us are thinking. And she reminds us that we are worthy of any space we occupy.

You would think that 41 years of public service would make Congresswoman Waters tired, but her laser focus is unmatched. When other policymakers criminalize protests, she is there, verbalizing our pain. She fights for funding to support neglected communities. And she takes to Twitter to raise her voice on our behalf, whether or not Congress is in session. In this time of sociopolitical unrest, Congresswoman Waters has been the brilliant, tenacious representative of the people that we all need.

She’s not new to it, she’s true to it.

More Poorer Residents Are Driving Cars, Presenting New Issues for Transit Agencies
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Waymo, A Google Spinoff, Ramps Up Its Driverless Car Effort
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Grocery Wars Turn Small Chains into Battlefield Casualties
by Michael Corkery, The New York Times
March 26, 2018

Unions dying? Membership soars in Inland Empire, shrinks near coast
PUBLISHED: | UPDATED:

When Professionals Rise Up, More Than Money Is at Stake

The teacher uprising that began in West Virginia has exposed a trend among
white-collar workers: a feeling that their credentials are being devalued.

Republican John Cox inches ahead of Antonio Villaraigosa for second place in California governor's race, new poll finds

Orange County to spend $70.5 million on permanent homeless housing, may add camps in 3 cities
By | jgraham@scng.com | Orange County RegisterPUBLISHED: | UPDATED:

Cardinal Tobin reminds crowd of
  church's lontime support of labor  
        'Solidarity is Our Word' event connects Pope Francis' words on work
March 8, 2018
Patricia Lefevere

Strong Performance by Democrat Conor Lamb in Pennsylvania Shakes Trump and G.O.P.

Case Number:
N/A
Case Panel:
N/A
Hearing Location:
Pasadena, CA
Hearing Date:
03/07/2018

The Secretive Company That Pours America’s Coffee

JAB, a European holding company that once made pool chemicals, is building a coffee empire out of a disparate group of brands
March 7, 2018

The Rising Ghosts of Labor in the West Virginia Teacher Strike

West Virginia Raises Teachers’ Pay to End Statewide Strike

My Union or My President? Dueling Loyalties Mark Pennsylvania Race
by Trip Gabriel, March 11, 2018
The New York Times

Why Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren are Eying Ohio in 2018
by Alexander Burns, March 11, 2018
The New York Times

The Secretive Company That Pours America's Coffee
by Zeke Turner in Germany & Julie Jargon in Los Angeles
March 7, 2018 , The Wall Street Journal

Leading liberal policy group unveils
‘coverage for all’ plan

 

Trump’s Steel Tariffs Raise Fears of a
Damaging Trade War

As Primaries Begin, Divided Voters Weigh What It Means to be a Democrat
by Jonathan Martin and Alexander Burns, March 4, 2018
The New York Times

The president was polarizing, even crude. The shocking became routine. Somehow, we survived 1968 — or did we?

March 1, 2018

 

East L.A., 1968: ‘Walkout!’ The day high school students helped ignite the Chicano power movement
March 1, 2018

Office of the Governor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Governor's Press Office

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

(916) 445-4571

Governor Brown Announces Appointments

SACRAMENTO – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the following appointments:

Bertheria Grady, 55, of El Dorado Hills, has been appointed chief deputy director of the California Office of Tax Appeals. Grady has served as director of the filing compliance bureau at the California Franchise Tax Board since 2011, where she has served in several positions since 2001, including director of the enterprise data management bureau, director of the audit administration and technology support bureau, director of the internal web and administrative systems bureau and director of the audit and filing compliance systems bureau. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $179,076. Grady is a Democrat. 

Jason Lopez, 47, of Sacramento, has been appointed director at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Division of Administrative Services. Lopez has been deputy director, fiscal services at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation since 2014, where he was associate director of the budget management branch from 2011 to 2014. Lopez was deputy director, fiscal and operations at the Yolo County Health Department in 2011 and held several positions at the California Rural Indian Health Board from 2001 to 2011, including chief financial officer, director of financial administration and assistant director of financial administration. Lopez was an auditor-appraiser at the Yolo County Assessor’s Office from 1996 to 2001 and held several positions at the California Franchise Tax Board from 1995 to 1996, including seasonal clerk and student assistant. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $160,764. Lopez is a Democrat.

Jennifer Osborn, 49, of Sacramento, has been appointed director of fiscal and business services at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Osborn has been deputy secretary of fiscal policy and administration at the California Government Operations Agency since 2013. She was deputy secretary of fiscal operations at the California State and Consumer Services Agency from 2012 to 2013 and principal program budget analyst at the California Department of Finance from 1998 to 2011. This position will require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $160,764. Osborn is a Democrat.

Ditas Katague, 52, of Sacramento, has been appointed director for the Complete Count Census. Katague has been California census coordinator at the California Department of Finance since 2017 and national chair of the U.S. Census Bureau, National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic and Other Populations since 2012. She was chief of staff to commissioner Cathy Sandoval at the California Public Utilities Commission from 2011 to 2017, chief deputy commissioner at the California Department of Corporations from 2010 to 2011 and director for census 2010 at the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research from 2008 to 2010. Katague was first vice president of public affairs at Countrywide/Bank of America from 2005 to 2008, program director at the California Telemedicine and eHealth Center from 2004 to 2005 and assistant secretary for transportation at the California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency from 2000 to 2003. She was chief deputy director of census 2000 for the California Complete Count Committee from 1999 to 2000. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $135,408. Katague is a Democrat. 

Adelina Zendejas, 58, of Sacramento, has been appointed deputy director for the Complete Count Census. Zendejas has been deputy director of the Broadband and Digital Literacy Office at the California Department of Technology since 2012. She was a data processing manager III at the State Board of Equalization from 2004 to 2012, a chief information officer at the Victim Compensation Board from 2002 to 2004 and a data processing manager II at the Department of Finance in 2002. Zendejas held several positions at the Department of Technology from 1997 to 2002 including, senior information systems analyst, data processing manager II, deputy director and special assistant to the director. She was a staff information systems analyst at the Health and Human Services Agency Data Center in 1997, where she was an associate information systems analyst from 1992 to 1997, and was a staff information systems analyst for the Department of Social Services from 1987 to 1992. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $133,248. Zendejas is a Democrat.

Darius W. Anderson, 53, of Sonoma, has been appointed to the California Community Colleges Board of Governors. Anderson has been chief executive officer and founder at Kenwood Investments since 2000 and at Platinum Advisors since 1998. He was chief of staff at Yucaipa Companies LLC and vice president of external affairs at Ralphs Grocery Stores Inc. from 1993 to 1998. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Anderson is a Democrat.

Arthur Krantz, 47, of Berkeley, has been appointed to the California Public Employment Relations Board. Krantz has been a partner at Leonard Carder LLP since 2002, where he was an associate from 1996 to 2002. He was a practitioner advisor for the University of California, Berkeley School of Law in 2017, where he was a lecturer in 2016. Krantz served as a judicial law clerk for the Honorable Ellen Bree Burns at the U.S. District Court, District of Connecticut from 1995 to 1996. He is a co-editor-in-chief of California Public Sector Labor Relations and an executive committee member of the California Lawyers Association, Labor and Employment Law Section. Krantz has served as a pro bono attorney for the Centro Legal de La Raza Asylum Project since 2014. He earned a Juris Doctor degree from the New York University School of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $147,778. Krantz is a Democrat.

Erich W. Shiners, 48, of Galt, has been appointed to the California Public Employment Relations Board, where he was a legal advisor from 2008 to 2011. Shiners has been senior counsel at Liebert Cassidy Whitmore since 2017. He was a partner at Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP from 2015 to 2017, where he was senior counsel from 2013 to 2015 and an associate from 2011 to 2013 and from 2006 to 2008. Shiners was a law clerk at Weinberg, Roger and Rosenfeld in 2006 and a judicial extern for the Honorable M.Kathleen Butz at the Third District Court of Appeal in 2005. He was a summer law clerk at the National Labor Relations Board in 2005 and at the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board in 2004. Shiners is a member of the California Lawyers Association, Sacramento County Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $147,778. Shiners is registered Green Party.

Priscilla S. Winslow, 65, of Berkeley, has been reappointed to the California Public Employment Relations Board, where she has served since 2013 and served as legal advisor from 2012 to 2013 and from 1979 to 1983. Winslow served as assistant chief counsel for the California Teachers Association from 1996 to 2012, where she was a staff attorney from 1983 to 1984. She was managing partner at the Law Offices of Priscilla S. Winslow from 1986 to 1996 and an adjunct professor at the New College of California School of Law from 1984 to 1993. Winslow was an associate at Boltuch and Siegel from1984 to 1986. She is member of the American Constitution Society. Winslow earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Davis School of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $147,778. Winslow is a Democrat.

Cathryn I. Rivera-Hernandez, 47, of Sacramento, has been reappointed to the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board, where she has served since 2002. Rivera-Hernandez served as chief deputy cabinet secretary in the Office of the Governor from 1999 to 2002. She was a new voter registration and event coordinator for Governor Gray Davis’ gubernatorial campaign in 1998. She is a mentor at the Florin High School Law Academy and a member of the Cruz Reynoso Bar Association and the Planned Parenthood Mar Monte Board of Directors, where she served as chair from 2015 to 2017. Rivera-Hernandez earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $147,778. Rivera-Hernandez is a Democrat.

Steven Morrow, 83, of Yucaipa, has been reappointed to the Dental Board of California, where he has served since 2010. Morrow has been associate dean for advanced dental education at the Loma Linda University School of Dentistry since 2014, where he has held several positions since 1980, including professor of endodontics and director of patient care services and clinical quality assurance.  He was a dentist and endodontist in private practice from 1963 to 2005 and served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Dental Corps, Active Reserves from 1962 to 1968 and lieutenant on active duty in the U.S. Navy Dental Corps from 1960 to 1962. Morrow earned a Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from the Loma Linda University School of Dentistry and a Master of Science degree in microbiology from Loma Linda University. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Morrow is a Democrat. 

Larry Sheingold, 71, of Sacramento, has been appointed to the California State Mining and Geology Board. Sheingold was owner and sole proprietor at Sheingold Associates from 1989 to 2018. He served as legislative staff in the Office of California State Senator Don Perata from 2005 to 2007, in the Office of California State Senator Betty Karnette from 2002 to 2005, in the Office of California State Senator Jim Costa from 1996 to 2002 and in the Office of California State Senator Henry Mello from 1980 to 1996. Sheingold served on the State Bar Examining Committee from 2008 to 2017. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Sheingold is a Democrat.

John Capitman, 63, of Tollhouse, has been reappointed to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District Governing Board, where he has served since 2014. Capitman has served in several positions at Fresno State University since 2005, including Nickerson distinguished professor in health policy and executive director of the Central Valley Health Policy Institute. He held several positions at Brandeis University from 1987 to 2004, including professor and director of long-term care studies at the Schneider Institutes for Health Policy. He held several positions at Virginia Commonwealth University from 1983 to 1987, including health policy analyst for the Virginia Center on Aging and assistant professor in the Department of Health Administration and the Department of Gerontology. He was a principal investigator at Berkeley Planning Associates and an evaluation research consultant at the California Department of Health Services, Office of Long-Term Care and Aging from 1980 to 1983. Capitman was a teaching assistant at the Duke University Department of Psychology and Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs from 1978 to 1980 and research director at the Center for Research in Social Dynamics from 1977 to 1979. He is co-founder and Board of Directors member at VISIONS Inc. Capitman earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree in psychology from Duke University. This position requires Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Capitman is a Democrat.

Tian Feng, 59, of Walnut Creek, has been reappointed to the California Architects Board, where he has served since 2014. Feng has been district architect at the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District since 2001. He was senior architect at LCA Architects from 2000 to 2001, an architect at JKA Construction Consultants from 1997 to 2000 and at Jacobs Engineering-Sverdrup Corporation from 1994 to 1997. He was project manager at Sue Associates Architecture from 1989 to 1994, architectural designer at Fong and Chan Architects from 1988 to 1989 and a teaching and research assistant at the University of Southern California School of Architecture from 1985 to 1988. Feng is a fellow at the American Institute of Architects and at the Construction Specifications Institute. He earned a Master of Building Science degree in architecture from the University of Southern California. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Feng is a Democrat.

Mark Nunez, 52, of Burbank, has been reappointed to the California Veterinary Medical Board, where he has served since 2013. Nunez has been medical director at the Veterinary Centers of America (VCA) Miller-Robertson Animal Hospital since 2018.  He was associate veterinarian at the Veterinary Care Center from 2012 to 2017, practice owner and veterinarian at Animal Medical Center Inc., Van Nuys from 2006 to 2012, medical director and veterinarian at VCA Animal Hospital, Burbank from 2002 to 2005 and VCA regional medical director from 1999 to 2001. Nunez was associate veterinarian at the Animal Medical Center Inc.,Van Nuys from 1994 to 1999 and at Dill Veterinary Hospital from 1993 to 1994. He is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, California Veterinary Medical Association, Southern California Veterinary Medical Association and the American Animal Hospital Association. Nunez earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California, Davis. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Nunez is a Democrat. 

Deborah Bedwell, 65, of Granite Bay, has been reappointed to the 20th District Agricultural Association, Gold Country Fair Board of Directors, where she has served since 2014. Bedwell was senior vice president and market manager at JP Morgan of Northern California from 2008 to 2011. She was senior vice president and division executive for Utah, Colorado and California at Washington Mutual from 1998 to 2008. Bedwell is president of the Friends of the Granite Bay Library Board and a past president of Soroptimist International of South Placer. She is a member of the Children’s Tumor Foundation Endurance Team. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Bedwell is registered without party preference.

Michael Carson, 57, of Newcastle, has been reappointed to the 20th District Agricultural Association, Gold Country Fair Board of Directors, where he has served since 2017. Carson has been an owner and operator at Gold Hill Gardens, B&B Inn and Event Center since 2013 and owner and consulting engineer at Michael Carson Development Incorporated since 2007. He was a project manager at JTS Communities Incorporated from 2000 to 2007. Carson is a member of the Gold Country Fair Heritage Foundation, Leadership Auburn Board of Regents, Auburn Chamber of Commerce and the Newcastle Community Association. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Carson is a Republican.

David Ebbert, 48, of Auburn, has been appointed to the 20th District Agricultural Association, Gold Country Fair Board of Directors. Ebbert has been an electric distribution supervisor at the Pacific Gas and Electric Company since 2010. He is a member of the Gold Country Fair Junior Livestock Auction Committee and the Gold Country Fair Heritage Foundation. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Ebbert is a Republican.

Samia Macon, 50, of Auburn, has been appointed to the 20th District Agricultural Association, Gold Country Fair Board of Directors. Macon has been a self-employed large animal veterinarian since 2004. She earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California, Davis. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Macon is a Democrat.

Anthony “Ray” Smith, 30, of Auburn, has been reappointed to the 20th District Agricultural Association, Gold Country Fair Board of Directors, where he has served since 2016. Smith has been a groundskeeper at Mike Carson Development since 2014. He was a pastry chef at the Winchester Country Club in 2014 and a shop manager at Royce Air from 2011 to 2013. He is a member of Leadership Auburn. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Smith is a Republican.

    ###

710 Freeway is a 'diesel death zone' to neighbors — can vital commerce route be fixed?

Labor Board’s Do-Over Leaves an Obama-Era Rule Intact

Orange County's riverside homeless begin trading tents for motel vouchers, other aid as camp is cleared
February 20, 2018

Photo gallery: Orange County's riverside homeless begin trading tents for motels
February 20, 2018

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pleasanton, CA 94566

 

BENESYS
1050 Lakes Drive, Suite 255
West Covina, CA 91790

TEAMSTERS FOOD TRUST
(626) 646-1090
Fax: (626) 931-1368
E-mail: staff@teamstersfood.org


TEAMSTERS SOFT DRINK TRUST
(626) 646-1090
Toll-free: (626) 931-1368
E-mail: staff@teamsterssoftdrink.org



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DAIRY
Medical
(562) 463-5000
OR (626) 284-4792


NORTHWEST ADMINSTRATORS (NWA)
Dental
2323 Eastlake Avenue East
Seattle, WA 98102-3305
(877) 214-8928
8:30am - 5:00pm M-F


BENEFIT PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION (BPA)
13191 Crossroads Parkway North, Suite 205
City of Industry, CA 91731

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE
RE: Participants currently enrolled in United Healthcare
January 8, 2013



PENSION INQUIRIES

Teamsters-National 401k

UPS ONLY - 401k—Pacific Coast Trust Fund
206-329-4900

The Western Conference of Teamsters Pension Trust Fund

Northwest Administrators

225 South Lake Ave., Ste. 1200
Pasadena, CA 91101
www.nwadmin.com


WTWT (Freight)
Toll-free: 1-800-572-5439

TEAMSTERS MISCELLANEOUS

(626) 463-6097
Toll-free: (877) 214-8928


SUPPLEMENTAL PENSION & SUPPLEMENTAL DEATH BENEFITS
Toll-free: (877) 214-8928

To schedule an appointment with the Pension (ONLY) field representative from the Western Conference of Teamsters Pension Trust please call Local 952 at (714) 740-6200. A pension representative comes to Local 952 every Thursday of the month from 9:00am to 4:00pm. If you wish to contact the pension department directly, please call one of the above numbers or visit www.nwadmin.com.

Teamster News Headlines
 
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Greece Central Teamsters Overwhelmingly Approve Four-Year Agreement
Statement of Solidarity with Teamsters Canada on Canada-U.S. Trade Issues
Rhode Island Teamsters Endorse Gina Raimondo for Governor
Teamsters Join Legal Challenge to Presidential Executive Orders that Impair Union and Employee Rights
Hoffa Pledges Solidarity With UAW During Speech at Union's Convention
Airline Division News, Week Ending June 9, 2018
Teamsters UPS, UPS Freight Committees Discuss Several Important Issues
 
     
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General Membership Meeting:
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20TH
@ 7:00 PM


NEXT Organizing Workshop:
TBD

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